The Legend of Zelda - Twilight Princess HD

The Legend Of Zelda – Twilight Princess HD- Comparison

Written by | News, Nintendo

Oh snap!! Guess who’s back?! That’s damn right it’s none other than your boy funk master Gee! I’m just kidding, anyways if you haven’t followed this blog than you must need to know that I’m a huge fan of Zelda, more Zelda more fun. So like all the Hyrulians out there I quickly jumped on the train and pre-ordered my copy of Twilight Princess HD Limited Edition w/ Soundtrack at Gamestop do it quick if you want a copy, they’re selling fast! So, onwards with what I’m talking about, many will know that this remake is looking quite better than the previous installment for obvious reasons, but let’s get in, with more in-depth information and a better comparison.

I will use comparison videos from other channels: So I will link their channel name along with their video so you can check out their channel, and all the other stuff I’ll be using for reference. So I hope we can get to this now that everything has been pushed aside. Let’s go!

 

The Comparison Video Wii U (vs.) Wii/GameCube

So we’ll be watching this video really quick to get a view of how far the game has gone with improvement and what we think should need a little more tuning to feel like a new game to us LOZ fans.

What do you think?! I know take a deep-breath, I will show you the proper technique or nerdgasm later, but focus. I personally think the remake looks great! But.. It looks still a little muddy like it’s latter version for the Wii, I feel like yes they have sharpened up the visuals a bit, but it looks still blurry and it still might be hard to see within the game, when you play the original version of the game you most likely understand what I mean. When looking at the gameplay you can clearly see the game, still has that somewhat presentation like if it was sculpted out of mud and plastered with blur. I love the game though, because the Wii U does fix that mostly, The cut-scenes look sharper and you can see the detail within the characters, maybe it’s just video that creates the visuals, but the video very much describes what we might get with the finished product, while things look a bit dated they still manage to maintain a kind of new about the game that feels like a real Zelda game even though it is one haha, another thing I noticed that I love most is that Nintendo or rather the Devs decided to increase visual effects, when link lunges his sword at enemies the slash seems larger, even riding Epona the strikes seem more vivid and dare I say.. Striking! This pleases me, nuff’ said. I also noticed that not only has Links visual effects changed but the combat system has also, Link slightly strikes more faster and cleaner in the Wii U than the Wii/GameCube Counterpart, Also something more , Epona who we all may know also gets a increase in movement and detail! She looks clean, even though the only bath she received was in the beginning of the game #LinkCleanThatHorse I love the way everything is fitting and being Nintendo they still have time to update the game, so we’ll have to wait and see more about what happens to the gameplay itself.

UPDATE NUMERO 1: Nintendo releases gameplay vid!

Okay so Nintendo releases a gameplay vid, awesome let’s check that one out and see what’s been changed…

First thing we can notice is that the game looks in-depth as crap! I mean literally it has depth it feels like we’re watching Link from a angled birds eye view. The detail is even better than we expected I guess we were looking at just cutscenes and not the actual game so much, I always loved how TP looked in the night and it just looks so much more vivid and clean in HD so much more character it brings out for real man! I expect to see some more new features, ah like this one! You can touch the touch screen on the gamepad to switch Link into his wolf form almost immediately, as much as you like to talk to Midna you need to do things without her sometimes so you can! With that being said.

I’ve been Ginto and GooOdByee!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last modified: January 25, 2016